Comet Update!

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If you enjoy observing comets, there are a couple of great opportunities right now to check out these icy travelers!

Comet C/2014 E2 (Jacques) is visible in evening skies again. This comet originated in the Oort cloud and was discovered on March 13, 2014 by Cristavao Jacques and the Southern Observatory for Near Earth Asteroids Research, a.k.a. SONEAR. This comet hung out in the evening sky for most of the Spring, brightening ever so slowly and finally reaching perihelion on July 2, 2014. Thanks to our nearest star, the comet has developed a tail and finally “looks” like a comet. Currently, this comet can be found in Cassiopeia and is visible through 10×50 binoculars as a faint fuzzball in a field of stars. Larger scopes will reveal the comet’s tail structure, and even larger scopes will show a faint green color, representing cyanogen and carbon emissions. C/2014 E2 (Jacques) is holding at magnitude 7 for now and is expected to brighten only slightly through September. This puts it out of the range of naked eye visibility, but makes it a great target for binoculars, telescopes, and imagers with even modest equipment.

Comet_Jacques_Michael-Jager
C/2014 E2 (Jacques) by Michael Jager
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C/2014 E2 (Jacques) Stellarium.org

 

Comet C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden) is not quite as bright as it’s evening companion and you’ll have to get up early (or stay up late) to see it in the constellation Monoceros. It’s currently at around magnitude 9, but is expected to brighten to around magnitude 5 by mid-September, putting it on the threshold of naked eye visibility from dark sky sites, such as Jon Wood Astronomy Field. This comet was discovered last November by astronomers at the Oukaimeden Observatory in Marrakech, Morocco. C/2013 V5 (Oikaimeden) originates from the Oort cloud as well and is expected to make a trip through our solar system once every 6,000 years. You’ll find this comet low in the eastern sky about 2 hours before sunrise in the constellation Monoceros. If you’re in the northern hemisphere, you’ll be able to see the comet until the start of September. Observers and imagers in the southern hemisphere will be able to track it for quite some time.

Oukaimeden_Damian_Peach_c2013_v5_2014_08_05
C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden) Damian Peach
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C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden) Stellarium.org

 

Clear Skies!

Steve Siedentop

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#OTD 1877 Asaph Hall discovers Phobos

Courtesy of NASA

#OTD in 1877 American astronomer Asaph Hall discovers Phobos, innermost moon orbiting Mars. It took the U.S. Naval Observatory’s giant 26-inch telescope to located tiny Phobos, whose mean radius is less than 7 miles.

Interestingly, Phobos is slowly spiraling closer to Mars, and will impact the plant in less than 100 million years.

Courtesy of NASA

Courtesy of NASA

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Category: Astronomy

Meteor trail from last night… also visible is the Double Cluster and the Andromeda Galaxy

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2014.07.27 24 sec at ISO 1600

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Saturday, July 12 – Mars, meet Spica… Spica, meet Mars

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Make your evening plans… head outside tonight about an hour after sunset and look southwest for two bright objects:  ruddy Mars and brilliant blue-white Spica.  The pair will be close, really close… less than 2 degrees apart!  Saturn too, is lurking, about 12 degrees away at 10 o’clock from the Mars-Spica pairing.  Enjoy.

July 12, 2014

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#OTD Zvezda Service Module launched to ISS

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#OTD in 2000, the Russian Zvezda Service Module was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, en route to the #ISS. The 40-plus foot module currently provides much-needed living quarters, life support, communications, and a docking station.

ZSM

In related news, #Today is the 5,000th day humans have been aboard #ISS.

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#OTD 1979 – Voyager 2 Passes Jupiter

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#OTD… July 9, 1979, Voyager 2 officially passes Jupiter on its way to visit the other three gas giants – Saturn (1981), Uranus (1986), and Neptune (1989).

Launched August 20,1977, Voyager 2 has been travelling for more than 36 years and is nearly 12 billion miles from Earth. If we could suddenly travel at the speed of light, we could catch Voyager 2 in just over 14.5 minutes!

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Saturday, July 5 – Moon, Mars and Spica Conjunction

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The First Quarter Moon, ruddy Mars, and brilliant blue-white Spica form a tight trio in the early nighttime sky. Northern hemisphere observers will see the halfway lit Moon and Mars less than 1 degree apart. Those observers in Central and South America will witness the moon pass directly in front of (occult) Mars!

Go outside just after dark and find the moon… easy. Mars will be just to the right and Spica off to the left. Enjoy.

MoonMarsSpica

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#OTD in 1997 – NASA’s Pathfinder Probe Lands On Mars

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#OTD in 1997, NASA’s Pathfinder probe, carrying the Carl Sagan Memorial Station and Sojourner rover, lands in the Ares Vallis region of Mars. The landing was anything but gentle… during entry, a parachute was used to slow the descent, and once near the surface, air bags were deployed and the probe dropped, bouncing several times before coming to rest.

The mission exceeded all expectations… more than 17,000 images were returned, chemical analyses was conducted on rocks and soils, and extensive weather data was received. And both the station and the rover outlived their expected design lives.

Pathfinder Atmospheric Descent and Landing
Mars Pathfinder Team Recalls July 4, 1997

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Category: Astronomy

#OTD June 29, 1868 – birth of astronomer George Hale

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GeorgeHale#OTD in 1868, astronomer George Ellery Hale is born in Chicago, Illinois. Among his many accomplishments, Hale is probably best known for his work in solar research, and was the architect of several large telescopes.

Few astronomers match Hale’s legacy… founder and long-time editor of the Astrophysical Journal; foreign secretary of the National Academy of Sciences (1910-1921); founder of the National Research Council; author of more than 450 titles (most on the analysis of various scientific research); recipient of several prominent awards; founder and director of the Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin (1892-1904) and the Mount Wilson Observatory near Pasadena, California (1904-1923); and inventor of the spectroheliograph, a photographic instrument capable of capturing an image of the sun at a single wavelength.

The minor planet 1024 Hale, the lunar crater Hale, the martian crater Hale, the Hale solar sector boundary, and the colossal 200-inch Hale telescope all bear his name.

Hale died in February 21, 1938 in Pasadena, California.

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#TBT – Celestron Comet Catcher Circa 1980

#TBT Celestron Comet Catcher ad circa 1980.

Celestron Comet Catcher Circa

 

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